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20130113
20130121
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ceiling, which is that not everybody understand what the debt ceiling is about. the debt ceiling, raising the debt ceiling, which congress has to do periodically, gives the government the ability to pay existing bills. it doesn't create new deficits. it doesn't create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family, which is trying to improve its credit rating sank i know how we can save money, we won't pay off credit card bills. not the most effective way to improve your credit rating. it was the very slow solution to the debt ceiling in august 2011 i got the u.s. downgraded last time. so it's very, very important that all these issues are important but it's very, very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where our government doesn't pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much of the challenges actually were addressed in the deal. as you mention it certainly went part way but it leaves another the issues still on the table, and additional negotiations and are looking. would you c
debt ceiling which will come into play so we will be seeing a lot of activity the next few months about the appropriate size of the government and about the size of the deficit and a lot of back-and-forth over these issues. without going into all of the different ramifications i want to say a word about the debt ceiling which is not everybody understands what it's about. the debt ceiling which congress has to do periodically as gives the government money to pay its existing bills. it doesn't create new spending so it's like a family trying to improve its credit rating not the most effective way to improve the credit rating and was the slow solution to the debt ceiling in august of 2011 that of the u.s. downgraded last time brough so it's very important that congress take the necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where our government doesn't pay its bills. estimate the number of people have expressed concern about how much of the challenges actually were addressed in the deal. as you mentioned is certainly went part way that leaves a number of issues still on th
a consensus on this in the political process that the debt ceiling has no rational place in this. the president addressed that yesterday, but the fact is playing russian roulette with the u.s. economy and the wellbeing of our population has no place in an honest debate about how much spending should be cut, how much investment should be made to address these broader economic and social deficit ands how to resolve this and get on to other parts of the national agenda. sooner or later, i think, the congress and the president will agree. you saw approaches to this in senator mcconnell's comments in the last couple of weeks and, obviously, in the president's that the key control is in the authorization and appropriation process, and the ability to pay those bills through either revenue sources or borrowing ought to be attached to the decision to spend, not used as a point of leverage in many broader and more or important negotiations. >> thank you, lew. can i just follow up, and i don't know if this is a little bit of a tan gent, but i think i just want to ask you because of your pos
. and number two, i think it is fido, as the president said so clearly yesterday, that the debt ceiling essentially must not use to say what then that essentially takes on and essentially undoes the basic full faith and credit of the united states of america. the president made so clear what would he have staked if that were to happen and i just think it's so critical that not occur. you know, i've been through these battles as i've said for many decades, but i don't remember anyone essentially saying we should go over the cliff in terms of the full faith and credit of the united states. the consequences with teeth, i think, to not take, potentially cataclysmic. and for the republicans who essentially say, let's do it, i think that would be a very, very serious mistake with foreseeable consequences. the federal reserve has said don't do it and i think the responsible position is we should not flirt with it. >> said they don't march on me with torches that they start asking you questions. something cataclysmic shouldn't be done in terms of reaching the debt ceiling, yet does science seem
that is failing to agree on increasing the debt ceiling on time and prior to that preferably and reaching agreement on medium-term debt reduction. that i mentioned earlier. for the nonadvanced economies, and i'm putting together the emerging markets as well as the low income countries, clearly those countries are faring at a much better pace in terms of growth. but everywhere i've traveled in the last two months in africa, in latin america and in asia there's always been a concern about the unbalances and the lack of decisive action to address the advanced economies' crisis. so this spillover effect including in terms of confidence building are clear. and given those, this increasing interconnectedness -- particularly with certain markets -- reducing this uncertainty is going to be key to the health of the global economy and to a lot of those regions that are still very dynamic to continue to grow at a pace that is sustainable and necessary for the well being of their population. this is excessively too general because when you go down the list of the emerging market economies and the low
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5